23 Sep 2016

NigeriaCom: Knowing what works as a Nigerian tech entrepreneur


By Olufemi Omotayo - Founder and Managing Editor, EntrepreNews

Nigerian technology entrepreneurs can create and grow viable businesses if they have more access to and utilise local resources.

The Oriental Hotel in Lagos recently played host to the 7th annual NigeriaCom, bringing together stakeholders in the telecoms and ICT sector to create discussion on deal flow around the nation’s digital future.

For two days, experts shared market insights on creating a better environment for tech SMEs and startups to develop; case studies of public private collaborations in m-Health; focused sessions on digital entertainment and matching content with the data gap.

For starters, did you know that the instant messaging market is currently witnessing another disruption besides WhatsApp?

CEO of Jongla, Riku Salminen, wowed the audience with statistics of how are capturing market share in Africa, using Nigeria as a key entry point.

Perhaps even more stunning is his announcement that Jongla has localised its offering to the Nigerian people, making it possible to communicate in the three major languages of Hausa, Igbo and Yoruba.


NigeriaCom plenary panel: Enhancing content integration to bridge the digital revenue gap – the rise of data driven services through smart devices

The key statistics from their survey so far reveal that news and information are top needs of Nigerians, followed by social networking.

Emeka Akano, the CEO of Jara Mobile corroborated this.

When asked about the kind of contents Nigerians love; he listed music videos, comedy, football, tech reviews, fashion, and gaming. But entrepreneurs must also find how to make these user-generated as it would accelerate their growth.

For Michael Ugwu, the GM West Africa of Sony Music, the question was whether Nigerians buy music? Surprisingly, he confirmed that their experience has been great since they launch last year and the Nigerian market is the fastest in Sub-Saharan Africa.

And, what is the secret of Goal.com? Daniel Price, Mobile Distribution Director, Perform Group says the secret is to keep innovating and changing things where necessary. He also advises that adding local flavour and voice is important.

Finally, he tells Nigerian entrepreneurs: “Don’t be afraid to fail.”


This report was originally published on EntrepreNews.

About the author:

Olufemi Omotayo is a social entrepreneur and multiple award-winning journalist/blogger with expertise in technology and entrepreneurship writing. He is the founder and managing editor of EntrepreNEWS, Nigeria’s foremost entrepreneurship medium. He is a seasoned speaker, mentor, facilitator and coordinator for many youth initiatives in Nigeria.

21 Sep 2016

AfricaCom touched down in Johannesburg

By Amy Turner - Com Series Staff Writer 

AfricaCom recently landed in Joburg for the launch of the bigger, better, bolder 2016 event.

The launch in Rosebank saw some of AfricaCom’s most prominent community members come together to discuss digital connectivity across the region, including a panel discussion themed: “Connecting Africa - Economic development and social empowerment through digital connectivity”.

The panel included: Luke McKend (MD at Google SA), Riaan Graham (Director of Sub-Saharan Africa at Ruckus Wireless) and Bora Varliyagci (Head of African Digital Infrastructure at Mott MacDonald), and was facilitated by Duncan McLeod, editor ofTechCentral. The panel discussed some of the challenges hindering connectivity on the continent and the opportunities and innovations that are available in connecting the last mile.

Take a look at what went on and what's in store at this year's AfricaCom, taking place between the 14-18 November, at the Cape Town ICC:



AfricaCom is is the incubator for the architects of Africa'a digital future dealing with the core issues and opportunities of broadband and digital inclusion. 

You can find out more about AfricaCom here.

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16 Sep 2016

5 reasons Mark Zuckerberg's visit is good for the Nigerian ecosystem


By Chukwuemeka Fred Agbata Jnr - Founder of techsmart.ng

Nigeria is unfortunately always in the news for the wrong reasons. Yes, I know that we have some internal challenges but I am of the opinion that international press usually focuses on the bad stories about our country. That's why I believe that this trip by Mark Zuckerberg is good for the ecosystem, despite his capitalist sensibilities and commercial mindset - it is about value but the value must make economic sense.


With 17 million users, Nigeria is the Facebook's largest Sub-Saharan African market


Below are my thoughts on his visit:

  1. Let's look at some numbers. According to a report published by Tech Crunch; "Facebook has 120 million users in Africa, 84 million of whom are in Sub-Saharan Africa. With 17 million users, Nigeria is the company’s largest Sub-Saharan African market, followed by South Africa (14 million), and Kenya (5.7 million), according to spokesperson Aldous. A particular Africa play by Facebook will be tapping the online advertising market that’s rising with the continent’s shift to digital commerce. Africa’s online sales are expected to top $75 billion on by 2025, with $10 billion of it occurring in Nigeria."

    This report simply shows the potentials for any investor who wisely invests in the Nigerian economy. Yes, it is risky and unpredictable but then if you get it right you'll never regret it. This is something I believe Mark has realised and why he decided to visit.

    I was with of these young people when Mark walked into CCHub Yaba, he even spared time to listen to what these young folks are doing

  2.  The world would suddenly realise that Nigeria is no longer a state in a country called Africa, but the most economically viable market in Africa. Believe it or not, it takes a huge personality like Mark to pull this off and it is going to happen. Did you turn on CNN or BBC or international media in the last few days? If you did then you'd realise that Mr. Zuck visiting Nigeria and walking the streets of Yaba would likely make Silicon Valley realise that this market has great potential.

  3. His visit would for a long time to come serve as a gun powder of inspiration for enterprising youths and techies working day and night to make a difference in one of the world's most difficult operating environments. I was with of these young people when Mark walked into CCHub Yaba, to our amazement - he even spared time to listen to what these young folks are doing.

    I'd like to see more physical Facebook presence and investments because, the truth is, that this market is very important for the brand going into the future

  4. I believe government and policy makers should brace up and come up with policies that will encourage the ecosystem at large to develop. For example, the Nigerian Government has to explore ways to see that Facebook also contributes to this market by ensuring they pay taxes and invest more in the Nigerian economy. That is a tall order I know because you need a good infrastructure and relevant skills to be able to monitor all revenues coming from Nigeria.

    Another riddle I put before the government and other relevant bodies such as the Federal Ministry of Communications, federal lawmakers; Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC); National Information Technology Development Agency (NITDA) and others is simple; how would Facebook Free Basics operate in Nigeria? Are we going to have a national say in what happens or we are just going to stand and act like nothing is going on? How are we going to ensure that Net Neutrality is maintained? India took action so we must as least negotiate with Facebook as Mark has now clearly shown how important this market is to his companies.

  5. Mark and his team at Facebook should TRULY regard Nigeria as a key hub and priority partner. Therefore, I'd like to see more PHYSICAL Facebook presence and investments because, the truth is, that this market is very important for the brand going into the future.

About the author:
CFA is the founder of www.techsmart.ng and co-producer/presenter of Tech Trends on Channels Television. 



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The Fourth Age: The socioeconomic benefits of NBN in East Africa - Nigel Bruin, Huawei

"We need to include everyone and turn the rhetoric into action"

Africa has stepped into a new broadband era:

This year's East Africa Com Industry Keynote Address was delivered by Huawei's Principal Consultant, Nigel Bruin.

The focus of this Industry Keynote was to provide analysis of how broadband enables real socioeconomic development in Africa and how we can get there.

From leveraging infrastructure synergy to connect the last mile, Nigel explains how the National Broadband Network in East Africa can further grow and develop the region's economy and services.

This Keynote also served to lay out the 6 proven ways to develop NBN and the role governements can play in developing sound regulatory policies that can promote omnipresent and affordable broadband services.


AfricaCom is is the incubator for the architects of Africa'a digital future dealing with the core issues and opportunities of broadband and digital inclusion.

You can find out more about AfricaCom here.

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13 Sep 2016

5 mistakes new African fintech entrepreneurs make


The African fintech space is growing fast, but there are a number of mistakes entrepreneurs make when entering the industry, according to Johan Meyer, founder and chief executive officer (CEO) of South African fintech company Wallettec.

As a fintech entrepreneur, I must say, there are times when our industry can be confusing but still exciting at the same time. There are too many fintech startups but are all promising “disruption”. In Africa, for example, we currently host over 200 fintech startups. It’s an explosive and promising industry and its bright future is undeniable. Our contribution in bringing in new and innovative ideas and inclusiveness cannot be underestimated.


According to KPMG, fintech investments hit an all time high reaching US$19.1 billion in 2015. It can come across as too crowded though, as some ideas seem recycled and irrelevant to the market. This has also given birth to countless conferences and seminars, which cost an arm and a leg to attend, let alone speak. We’re searching for that next big idea. Fintech is defining its space and we’re always asking, how can we make financial services better, cheaper, exciting and inclusive with no boundaries?

At Wallettec, for example, we partner with other fintech companies in seven countries. One thing we have in common with other fintech entrepreneurs we connect with throughout Africa and the world, is we believe financial technology has the power to truly empower people, not only by giving them the tools to trade but by also enabling them to expand their income by means of new services they can offer to the community access to financial services to protect their income and their families.

As someone who’s been operating in the fintech space for over a decade, I’ve observed a few challenges and mistakes new African entrepreneurs make when entering the industry. Below are five of them.




Solving African problems with a global person in mind


Our challenges should be solved with a local in mind. A massive percentage of Africa is underbanked and still using feature phones. Why do most fintech companies concentrate on disrupting the banking industry by developing digital banking apps for smartphones, if most of their market is still on feature phones? Out of the 550 million mobile phone subscribers in Africa, less than one-third owns a smartphone.


If it works in the UK or US, it will work in Africa


Most fintech companies copy what’s being done in America or Europe and try to bring it to Africa. Once again it’s a no! Africa is a very unique market and should be treated that way. The same applies in the USA and UK, they look at African countries such as Kenya and think products like M-Pesa would work – it fails almost all the time.


The financial inclusion theory


All fintech startups claim that they work on financial inclusion. True financial inclusion isn’t just payments only. It helps a street merchant gets access to income protection. It gives the elderly the ability to get funeral cover or claim social grants without travelling for hours just to stand in a queue and get their grant money.



DIY


Doing it yourself in fintech is like trying to win a war with one soldier, the market is massive. If fintech companies could start working together and develop a true solution that will unify different fintech industries, they’d all benefit. For instance, in South Africa, when banks formed the Payments Association of South Africa (PASA), they unified. There’s no way single fintech companies can disrupt the industry in Africa if they don’t work together.


Not doing research


Before developing a solution, find out what your market needs. The only way to develop a true workable solution is to know what the problem is. Most fintech startups develop solutions without an idea of what their market needs.




This post comes courtesy of Disrupt Africa:



This year's AfricaCom is home to the bigger, better, bolder AHUB powered by Ericcson.

The AHUB is the meeting place for Africa’s start-up community – linking business ready entrepreneurs, developers and start-ups with accelerators, investors, VCs and business mentors and will allow delegates to position themselves at the forefront of the technology changing tomorrow and understand how the African investor community operates

To find out more about AfricaCom, taking place in Cape Town in November 2016, click here.

9 Sep 2016

Vecna Cares - social upliftment through advanced wireless technologies

By Deborah Theobald - Co-Founder of Vecna Technologies and and Emily Ellison Taylor - Vecna Cares Charitable Trust

As ICT industry leaders from around Nigeria and West Africa gather in Lagos in September for Nigeria Com 2016, there is an important conversation happening around how investment in ICT networks and strengthening digital networks in the country could spur economic growth. Just recently, AllAfrica reported that the leader of the Nigerian software company SystemSpecs has “urged the federal government to refocus its attention on information communication technology for speedy economic growth in light of dwindling oil prices on the international market.”

Advanced wireless technologies can help stakeholders realise social benefits

Indeed, the opportunity to leverage the booming ICT industry for economic development in Nigeria is important and deserves sustained and focused investment. But, there is another equally compelling way that investments in ICT infrastructure and markets can impact Nigeria: advanced wireless technologies can help stakeholders realise social benefits.



Specifically, investment in extending robust and reliable wireless networks to rural Nigeria, paired with equipping frontline health workers with the necessary hardware components (smart phones, tablets) will permit better quality data collection and records keeping. The extended wireless coverage will allow data from disparate geographies to be aggregated in a cloud based database, allowing more exhaustive and nuanced analysis of data on human resources for health, health care utilisation rates, healthcare spending and health outcomes. Access to this information will help with better, data-driven decision making at all levels of the Nigerian health sector.

The program...put[s] actionable data in the hands of policy and decision makers in less time than the previous paper-based process

As an example, let’s examine the structure, inputs and outcomes of a current program deploying advanced wireless technologies. Together, Vecna Cares and InStrat Global Health Solutions have been working in Nigeria on the CliniPAK360 program since 2013. To date, CliniPAK360 has been deployed to 51 facilities in four states throughout Nigeria and will reach 100 Primary Health Care centers by the end of 2016 in six states. This program puts Android tablets in the hands of healthcare workers to capture data at the point of care and CliniPAK360 employs advanced wireless technology to assist healthcare workers in capturing key data elements during every patient encounter. The program aggregates patient data in real time and accelerates the reporting process at the facility and state level, putting actionable data in the hands of policy and decision makers in less time than the previous paper-based process. This leads to a better and more timely understanding of the health burden, improved connection between the state and local health resources, and a consistent quality of care with each patient interaction. These advantages help facilities become more efficient and make clinicians more effective, helping to drive down the number of maternal and infant deaths. Lives are saved and costs are contained.



The project operates with a grant from Qualcomm® Wireless Reach™, which implements programs in five areas: health care, education, entrepreneurship, public safety, and the environment. Important, strategic, and well-defined, each of these can, and does benefit greatly from the introduction of advanced wireless technology as a well-suited solution to development issues.

We encourage the attendees at Nigeria Com to engage in inter-sectoral and collaborative conversations, recognizing the many ways improved ICT infrastructure can propel Nigeria forward. We look forward to participating in these conversations!


Qualcomm will be taking part in Nigeria Com 2016.

Deborah Theobald, the Co-Founder of Vecna Technologies and the Executive Director of Vecna Cares, will be speaking on day 1 of Nigeria Com on: Understanding the value-chain of connectivity for improving healthier lives and societies in Nigeria.

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6 Sep 2016

Doing IM differently - The new trends and tech changing how Nigerian's communicate in 'mobile Africa'



Worldwide, instant messaging has become the number one communication platform for personal as well as business-to-consumer messaging. Ordering a taxi, shopping, banking, customer service, chats, internet content, dating, hobbies and lots more are increasingly chat based. Whether it’s between individuals, a business and an individual or a chatbot and an individual, instant messengers are becoming the centre of all communication. While still dominated by SMS, emerging markets like Nigeria are expected to follow this trend.


In feature phone-heavy Nigeria, SMS has been the number one way of messaging. The domination of SMS in B2C messaging is impressive in Nigeria - way above the global average. Research results by Mobile Ecosystem Forum revealed that 47% of Nigerians receive an unwanted SMS every day. Globally the same figure is only 28%. The shift of messaging to instant messengers is a global phenomenon and we can expect Nigeria to follow, seeing the move away from SMS.

93% of Nigerian adults own a mobile phone, of which 51% are smartphones

Instant messaging is coming to Nigeria as smartphone penetration grows. 93% of Nigerian adults own a mobile phone, of which 51% are smartphones. Even though the figures are rapidly growing, only some 6% of the Nigerian population is using social services like Jongla, Snapchat or Facebook on smartphones. The growth of the social service usage in Nigeria is driven by men, as 66% of Facebook accounts belong to them.

We are going to see explosive growth in mobile social usage. Nigeria is a mobile first country with only 13% of adults owning a laptop or desktop computers. There’s huge potential for social smartphone apps as the remaining half of mobile phone owners adopt smartphones in the coming years. Of the 185 million people in Nigeria, some 11 million are so far accessing social apps via mobile. 

In Nigeria, mobile networks are often unreliable and mobile data is expensive

To win over the Nigerian audience, we had to overcome the obstacles characteristic of emerging markets. In Nigeria, mobile networks are often unreliable and mobile data is expensive. In order to deliver messages safely and to save user’s prepaid data plans, we have built the service to transfer as little data as possible.

Where Jongla aims to win the battle for Nigerian instant messenger users is through innovation and creating a light but full-featured app. We have made the strategic decision to make our apps as low in data consumption as possible. This way, people in emerging nations can save money and data with our messenger.


  • Lite – world’s lightest messenger helps people to save money and data
  • Jongla Out – send messages and chat with people inside or outside Jongla
  • People – built-in community helps users to discover interesting new people nearby
  • Reactions – a new way to express friendship and an interest in meeting new people
  • Push-to-talk with filters – voice filters that add a layer of fun to voice messaging

Lite: Within the next two years, a whole new generation of mobile natives, roughly a billion people, will access the mobile Internet, mostly via low-end smartphones with prepaid plans. Emerging markets, the driver of this growth, still suffer from low connectivity and the high cost of data. In 2015, Jongla became the world’s lightest full-featured messaging app in an effort to help people save money and data. According to our studies, Jongla uses 80% less data compared to Viber and 25% less data compared to Facebook Messenger. Jongla also takes a fraction of data to download compared to all major competitors.
Jongla Out: Jongla Out technology means that chatting is no longer restricted to a specific app or platform. Jongla users now have the ability to chat as normal with any of their contacts, no matter what messaging service their contact is using, or even if they don’t use any. The receiver can reply via free web chat. This makes messaging simple and barrier-free for everyone. 

Jongla users can now discover and interact with new friends based on their location with a built-in community feature

People: Since summer 2016, in addition to chatting, Jongla users can now discover and interact with new friends based on their location with a built-in community feature called ‘People’. The feature was designed to enable users to be able to discover interesting new people around them. To protect user privacy, only an approximate location is given and the feature is optional.

Reactions: Also, added alongside the community, is the ability to engage with user profiles with a choice of reaction. Reactions can be exchanged between people to express emotions from a simple thumbs-up, smile or even a virtual flirtation with a heart. Our emotions towards other people might sometimes be hard to put into words. We wanted to give our users a way to express their friendship or interest towards new people in a meaningful and fun way.



Push-to-talk with filters: Push-to-talk is a feature that allows quick messaging even for those who have a hard time writing messages for different reasons. We wanted to make this feature worthwhile for even those who didn’t find the feature useful before. This is why in May 2015, we released a unique voice effects studio within Jongla. With this innovative feature, users are able to record up to one minute push-to-talk messages and choose from pre-installed high quality voice filters making the sound like a squirrel, monster or the police. Think Instagram for voice.


About the author:

Riku Salminen is one of the industry pioneers working on new OTT messaging services. Riku and his global team at Jongla is on a mission to change how people communicate in the future and driving one of the most promising mobile messaging startups towards innovation and success.

Riku has worked previously in the fields of telecommunications, media, advertising, gaming and startups. As an innovator and driver Riku has spent his entire career involved in creating new digital innovations and businesses.





Riku will be speaking and taking part in two sessions at Nigeria Com 2016.

Day 2:
09:00
Industry address: Disrupting the instant messaging market The future of IM for Nigerian market needs


09:20
Plenary panel: Enhancing content integration to bridge the digital revenue gap – the rise of data driven services through smart devices


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Sources:
  • Digital in 2016 by WeAreSocial 
  • Mobile Ecosystem Forum’s Messaging report 
  • Android Application Package sizes in Google Play Store, May 17th, 2016 
  • A data consumption study carried out by Jongla with Android SDK command line tools and Linux Kernel, June 7th, 2016


31 Aug 2016

Nigeria Com speaker spotlight - Ultima Studio's Oyewale Oyepeju


By Amy Turner - Com Series Staff Writer, KNect365


The Nigeria Com Speaker Spotlight Interview Series continues this week with a look at the Nigerian online and digital entertainment industries and how cloud services are currently being deployed in the sector.  

We spoke to Oyewale Oyepeju, Head of IT at Ultima Limited - Nigeria's foremost television production company, which produces some of the country's top programmes, including Who Wants to Be a Millionaire and Project Fame West Africa.

Oyewale discusses how cloud services are able to nurture local content, what challenges still hinder cloud adoption and the secret to Nollywood's success. 
   
1. We look forward to welcoming you to Nigeria Com, next month. You’re presenting on utilising the adoption of cloud services in the online and digital industries - how are cloud services currently employed in a Nigerian broadcasting context and are adoption rates by studios and broadcasters high?

Cloud services are predominantly used for content marketing and ad hoc purposes within the Nigerian broadcasting sector. Video streaming platforms are used for the live broadcasting of events and on-demand video services. The use of cloud for post-production purposes is almost non-existent as many broadcasters still rely on on-premise post-production suites. The adoption of cloud among broadcasters is low and the approach to cloud within the broadcast ecosystem is more personal than collaborative and ad hoc in nature.


"The Nigerian entertainment industry has grown in leaps and bounds, thanks to social media and innovations from young Nigerians"

2. You have been working as the Head of I.T at Ultima Studios for nearly 6 years, what changes and developments have you seen with regards to cloud services and the Nigerian digital entertainment industry in general?

Global cloud providers are gradually making their presence known in the country. There are also collaborative efforts among OEMs (Original Equipment Manufacturers, ISPs (Internet Service Providers) and cloud providers in simplifying cloud services and products. I have also seen some fair attempts to cater for the needs of broadcasters and to encourage some of us to utilise cloud. The Nigerian entertainment industry has grown in leaps and bounds, thanks to social media and innovations from young Nigerians who are churning out entertainment content that have put the country on the global entertainment map. 


Telco platforms have also been instrumental in much of the development witnessed over the years. Music tracks and videos are offered as value-added products to mobile subscribers, providing income streams and empowering the growing youth population. We have also witnessed growth in e-commerce within the digital entertainment industry. E-payment platforms are leveraged to provide billing support for video and audio on-demand services. Live coverage of events with OB Van is beginning to be an option rather than a necessity. There is also global recognition for our creative talents, and this is not just for performing artists, but also other talent in the entertainment value chain.

"IT at Ultima has grown from a support department to a strategic business enabler. We have developed from being a cost centre to an income-generating department"

3. How has your role developed with the change and exponential growth in the entertainment industry in Nigeria?

My role has indeed developed over the years. It has evolved from managing IT infrastructure to the addition of digital and value-added services in my sector. I now play a key role in the application of new technologies for strategic initiatives that have set Ultima apart as a leading entertainment content production company in Africa. 


IT at Ultima has grown from a support department to a strategic business enabler. We have developed from being a cost centre to an income-generating department. We are saddled with the responsibility of making the best use of available digital platforms and infrastructures, achieving more with less, as broadcast, marketing and information technologies converge. 

Collectively, we have achieved many firsts in digital initiatives within the entertainment industry. All these can be attributed to Ultima’s culture of Innovation, continual improvement, customer excellence and value creation.


4. How do cloud services nurture the entertainment industry and make developing local content easier?

Cloud services have bridged gaps and encouraged collaboration among artists across countries. Nigerian entertainment content is now receiving the attention of people across the world. International acts are collaborating with our artists as a result of the appreciation of the works of Nigerian artists. 


Cloud services would continue to make entertainment content available to a wider audience, preserve and protect content as digital right management evolves. Access to cutting edge tools on cloud platforms will improve the quality of content. Availability of backup services will also protect investment in entertainment content. 

The ability to monetise content across multiple marketing and social platforms with resultant positive impact on bottom lines will encourage local content developers. Improvement in multi-platform distribution of content with its resultant effects on revenue assurance will also encourage local content development.

"Cloud providers also need to be innovative in cloud product development. Not all existing cloud products are suitable for the Nigerian online and digital industry"

5. What are still the major challenges or blockers to higher adoption rates of cloud and how can they begin to be overcome?


We still have infrastructural bottlenecks, general paranoia, unfavourable price points, lack of trust, dearth of innovation, lack of awareness, privacy, regulatory and compliance issues as major challenges. 50% of the Nigerian population that are online are limited with wireless broadband. Real growth in cloud adoption will come with fixed broadband penetration that is currently at 10%. The Federal Government should do more than promising fixed broadband penetration of 36% by 2018. 


We want accelerated efforts towards infrastructural development. Free-basics should be re-imagined. We need to have true free basics in Nigeria that give more data allowance than a few MBs. Regulatory and oversight functions must encourage local cloud players for faster adoption. 

IT needs to also bridge the knowledge gap between IT and finance on one hand and IT and business on the other. IT leaders need to effectively communicate the benefits of cloud beyond the nice-to-haves. The cloud discussion should not be seen as one that needs to be desperately won, but rather one that needs to factor in the views of other stakeholders. 

Cloud providers also need to be innovative in cloud product development. Not all existing cloud products are suitable for the Nigerian online and digital industry. We want to see more stakeholder engagement towards the roll out of cloud products in the country. Having a cloud service that delivers value for broadcasters and independent content producers should be achievable within the Nigeria context.

"Netflix's entry into the continent is a welcome development and one that must be applauded"

6. Netflix has recently launched on the continent; do you believe it is a threat to local content creation and local television channels? Or could it actually be a welcome addition to the space and spur more diverse, locally produced content?

Netflix's entry into the continent is a welcome development and one that must be applauded. I do not see it as a threat to local content creation or local TV channels. 


In fact, Netflix needs to have local content in their library to be able to woo local subscribers. Netflix's entry will not cause any significant loss of market share for the local television channels. It would need to develop local content before any significant market share is won. 

Its entry will encourage more diverse local content development and further spur local channels to innovate and do more in other to retain their subscriber base.


7. Do you believe current business models are sustainable for local production and content creation?


The current business models are not sustainable. Key initiatives that encourage more diverse business models need to be encouraged. There is still some sort of monopoly in the content market, with the value and price of content being determined by a few content marketing companies and not necessarily by the market forces. 


Independent content producers are also not able to push their content to a wider audience even on “fremium” platforms, due to insufficient marketing budget. 

However, Digital Switch Over (DSO) of all TV stations in Nigeria is a game changer that will encourage a level playing field for everyone. DSO will encourage more DTT ownership, bridge the gap between content producers and channel owners and also encourage data-driven business decisions. Moreover, the DSO is an improvement in the quality of transmission.

"Nollywood is said to be 3rd largest film industry in volume, owing to the resilience and ingenuity of Nigerian content producers"


8. Nigeria’s biggest success story in entertainment and film has undoubtedly been Nollywood; what is it about the Nollywood model that has taken the world by storm? How do you think it is going to grow and adapt in this African digital age?

The Nollywood model is rooted in the conversion of Nigerian cultural diversity, historical, political, socio-economic values and beliefs into films, at a relatively low budget. Nollywood is said to be 3rd largest film industry in volume, owing to the resilience and ingenuity of Nigerian content producers. 


The growth in Nollywood would be consolidated in the digital age. Most of these stories that have been appreciated in films would reach a wider audience as digital technology awareness and affordability improve. Improvement in digital distribution will also translate to improvement in Nollywood, in both volume and value. 

Furthermore, more investment in local content production will be experienced as quality standards are being raised in this digital age. The stories will not change much but the context will, as many content producers concentrate more on contextual issues in film production.


"I look forward to sharing knowledge, networking and collaborating on key areas that will encourage the growth of cloud adoption"



9. What do you expect from speaking at Nigeria Com 2016?

I expect an understanding of the key issues affecting cloud adoption in Nigeria. I'm also looking forward to seeing a good turnout of stakeholders within the online, broadcast and digital industries.

10. What are you most looking forward to at this year’s event?

I look forward to meeting stakeholders within the online and digital industry, as well as sharing knowledge, networking and collaborating on key areas that will encourage the growth of cloud adoption within the online and digital industries.


Oyewale will presenting on day 2 of Nigeria Com 2016 on: Presentation: Utilising the adoption of cloud services in the online and digital industry

You can find out more about the event here.

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